The Resistance
Gemma Malley




The year is 2140. Peter and Anna are now living on the Outside as 'Legals'. As an agent in the Underground, Peter is given the task of infiltrating Pincent Pharma Corporation (run by his grandfather, Richard Pincent) which is chasing the holy grail of modern science - 'Longevity Plus', a drug which will reverse ageing. Peter must feign a reconciliation and win the trust of Pincent, one of the most powerful men on the planet; but his grandfather has his own plans for Peter - plans which involve Peter and Anna signing The Declaration and endorsing Longevity Plus. At the heart of the organisation he most despises, Peter stumbles across something more sinister than he could ever have imagined.

"This is a fantastic book, rich with love, action and philosophical depth. It was a riveting read with violent twists and turns which would render any reader unable to put it down." (Daniel Amir)
Alex, from University College School London

I thought The Resistance was just all right as it took me about fifty pages to start enjoying at all. I am not a fan of Science Fiction or of books set in the future. I think the setting of the book is almost childish, the kind of cartoon that a six year old would watch on the television. It almost seems like a modern remake of Indiana Jones and is very “clear set”. There are goodies, in it to help mankind, and baddies, who are in it to make a quick buck. I rate it 3 stars.

Ankita, from Newcastle Under Lyme School

The Resistance is about a boy called Peter, whose grandfather runs Pincent Pharma, the producer and supplier of ‘Longevity’ drugs. Peter believes that this is wrong and he gets a job in the factory. Then he notices that the factory is worse than he expected it to be, and he is the only one who can stop it.

 

Not having read the prequel, The Declaration, I found that it was difficult to understand the book and the characters properly. Gemma Malley has undoubtedly written the book very well, and has portrayed the emotions of the characters excellently, but the plot was still not good enough overall. It does have some unusual twists to it which make the reader eager to read on to see what happens, but it is not a book that I would want to read again.  I think that this book is best for 13-15 year olds who are into science-fiction.

Annabel, from The Thomas Hardye School Dorchester

The year is 2140. Death is no longer inevitable; humans have discovered a cure to their most threatening enemy. Peter Pincent – grandson of one of the most powerful men in the world – and Anna Covey are living as  'Legals' in a distorted world; a drug has been discovered which can prevent aging. Humans can live forever. The only problem is 'surpluses' – children born into a world with no more room. These children are taken away from their parents and the law 'A life for a life' is put into action. Rebels, the Underground, fight with nature: against excessive science. Who will win the fight of immortality?

 

 

Firstly, I found this book gripping from start to finish and regretted putting it down. A gripping science fiction storyline with everything a book needs and more. I enjoyed this book a lot and would love to read more of Gemma Malley's books. I would recommend this book to people age 12+ because the language can get complicated: science fiction technology is not simplistic.

 

 

 

 

 

Callum, from University College School London

The Resistance is a book about the future, where science, through Longevity, has enabled people to live forever, in ‘a life sentence that keeps repeating itself’. The plot focuses on Peter and Anna, teenagers living a life of rebellion in their society that views children as an unnecessary drain on precious resources.

 

Anna lived in a ‘Surplus Hall’ – a place for children to live a life of repayment for the crime of being born. However, Peter then arrived and together they escaped. In my opinion The Resistance explains what you need to know about the characters’ past without giving too much away about the prequel, The Declaration, very well. The Resistance now sees Anna and Peter living in the outside world as Legals in 2040. However, although they are now Legals, their youth makes them conspicuous in the community, and they are still treated very badly, almost like criminals. They join the Underground, a group of people who are fighting to expose the truth about Longevity, and to release people from their brainwashed state that Longevity is a fight against the evil Mother Nature.

 

Peter’s estranged grandfather, Richard Pincent, is the head of Pincent Pharma, the producer and supplier of Longevity drugs, in which scientists are breaking human rights to develop more advanced drugs. Peter pretends to ‘see the light’ and starts to work for his grandfather in Pincent Pharma, but in fact the Underground has asked him to do so in order that they can gain access to the corporation, and can find information about the disturbing practices taking place behind locked doors in Pincent Pharma.

 

One criticism I have of the book is that many interesting questions thrown up by this view of the future are brushed aside, and the ones that are mentioned are over-simplified, and are explained to the reader, which leaves little room for thought. There are sections where the emotional state of the characters are almost fully explained, so I as the reader felt that this view had been almost imposed on me, without any decision from me.

 

Many of the characters are very two-dimensional – they hold very simplistic views, and seem very stereotypical. The genders of Peter and Anna are made into stereotypes – Anna is the ‘rescued damsel in distress’, who stays at home at looks after the child, and Peter goes exploring into the world of science, power and corruption.

 

I would not call it a great book, but there were interesting questions raised, and a lot of it was very ‘moreish’ – I felt like I would read just one more chapter, and just one more etc. All in all, a good read.

 

Charley, from The Thomas Hardye School Dorchester

The Resistance is a fantastically well written dystopian thriller (vision of the future that isn’t pleasant).  Energy coupons restrict the amount of energy people use; having children is against the law to try to control the population.  A pill has been invented to make people live for ever and baby clothes and prams are on the black market.  There is a rebel group who fight against the longevity pills and for the rights of young people who are regarded with disgust. 

 

Overall, The Resistance is an unsettling view of the future, but very believable.  

Charlotte, from The Thomas Hardye School Dorchester

In the year 2140 Peter and Anna, members of the Underground, are fighting for humanity while people at Pincent Pharma are experimenting with Longevity Plus.

 

The Resistance is an exciting book.  I am not usually keen on sci-fi but I couldn’t wait to get home to continue reading. As soon as you think you can guess what is going to happen, clever twists suddenly change the course and you must read on to find out.

Charlotte, from The Henrietta Barnett School London

The Resistance is a modern yet futuristic book, aimed at young adults. It has a strong storyline and displays many situations and emotions throughout the chapters. The book has a lot of character, with almost a unique feeling when the reader turns each page. However, some subjects mentioned in the book could be upsetting to sensitive readers.

 

The book focuses on Peter and Anna, who have been forced into a scheme called the ‘Underground’, as death is now unheard of and children are seen as costly and time-consuming, after a drug called ‘Longevity’ produces immortality. Childbirth is then seen as illegal. Some people however, such as the Underground, are against it. They also save children from Surplus Hall (mostly concentrated on in the previous book in the series, The Declaration), which is where Anna escaped from.

 

Pincent Pharma Corporation, of which Peter’s grandfather is the President, is close to releasing Longevity+. Peter takes the opportunity to work there as a chance to find out more, as well as collect enough money to repay his lengthy bills and debts. It is almost unnoticeable at first (depending on the reader), but as the book progresses Richard Pincent (Peter’s Grandfather) seems to become even more manipulative, persuasive and scheming, and it begins to show that he is a cruel and power-hungry man.

 

The book is not as straightforward as it seems, and also has a darker side. The language used is basic, and it could test the reader with some harder words to make it a touch more interesting. The author creates a good atmosphere at the different points of the book, and the strong storyline does help keep the reader on track when the story gets into more depth. The ending is much unexpected - even in the last few sentences! It builds up for the last few chapters, which makes it even tenser, given the nature of the book.

 

I really enjoyed this book as it has a different nature to many other books written recently. I would recommend reading the other book in the series if you are unsure about any of the characters or topics.

Charlotte, from The Henrietta Barnett School London

The Resistance is a modern yet futuristic book, aimed at young adults. It has a strong storyline and displays many situations and emotions throughout the chapters. The book has a lot of character, with almost a unique feeling when the reader turns each page. Some subjects mentioned in the book could be upsetting to sensitive readers.

 

The book focuses on Peter and Anna, who have been forced into a scheme called the ‘Underground’, as death is now unheard of and children are seen as costly and time consuming, after a drug called ‘Longevity’ produces immortality. Childbirth is then seen as illegal. Some people however, such as the Underground, are against it. They also save children from Surplus Hall (mostly concentrated on in the previous book), which is where Anna escaped from.

 

Pincent Pharma Corporation, of which Peter’s Grandfather is the President, are close to releasing ‘Longevity+’. Peter takes the opportunity to work there as a chance to find out more, as well as collect enough money to repay his lengthy bills and debts. It is almost unnoticeable at first, (depending on the reader), but as the book progresses, Richard Pincent (Peter’s Grandfather) seems to become even more manipulative, persuasive and scheming, and it begins to show that he is a cruel and power hungry man.

 

The book is not as straightforward as it seems, and also has a darker side. The language used is basic, although it could test the reader with some harder words to make it a touch more interesting. The author creates a good atmosphere at the different points of the book, and the strong storyline does help keep the reader on track when the story gets into more depth. The ending is much unexpected - even in the last few sentences! It builds up for the last few chapters, which makes it even tenser, given the nature of the book.

 

I really enjoyed this book as it has a different nature to many other books written recently. I would recommend reading the other books in the series if you are unsure about any of the characters or topics.

Daniel, from University College School London

After having read The Declaration, the prequel to this book, I was anxious to find out what would happen to Anna and Peter. As the last book ended in a manner which seemed so certain at the time, we find out in The Resistance just how difficult promises are to keep, and how love can sway our decisions beyond recognition.

 

The storyline allows us more insight into the most powerful ‘villain’ in the future world the author created – Richard Pincent. As chief of longevity, it is, throughout the story, constantly suggested that he is the one to blame, through heritage and through management of the company that manufactures the drugs.

 

Furthermore, we delve into the lives of the hero and heroine, and discover how their love is unbreakable. The author’s trials and tribulations truly test them throughout the book, and allow you to make your own observations as to how strong their love is.

 

The characters, as in the prequel, are written very well, allowing you to feel a connection to them, and letting you share in their experiences and emotions.  The scenery allows you to ‘put a face to’ a world which, through its nature, seems bleak and inhospitable.

 

As well as being an excellent read, Gemma Malley’s world in The Resistance brings many questions to the mind of any reader, allowing him or her to look beyond the words of the story and think about how it may apply to his life.  It is not often that a book written for teenagers explores  ideas like: “Do I want to live forever?” and “Would I if I had the chance to do so?”

 

Also, ideas of a similar nature are triggered by the relationship we find in the story. These are ideas that children or young adults wouldn’t normally explore, for example: “Is there a limit to what you can do in the name of love?”  This fashion of writing means that the book doesn’t end once the reader has finished it: it stays in his mind and swills around, asking him questions which, as aforementioned, wouldn’t enter his mind.

 

On that basis, I must argue that this is a fantastic book, rich with love, action, and philosophical depth. It was a riveting read with violent twists and turns which would render any reader unable to put it down.  Its depth in location and description, together with the characters about which we discover more, makes it a book perfectly suitable for 13-14 year-olds. A very good book.

Ed, from Sturminster Newton High School, Dorset

Set in the future where people no longer age due to a drug and children are banned, Peter and Anna are now ‘legal’. Peter must infiltrate Pincent Pharma to gain information for the ‘Underground’.

 

Without reading the first book, The Declaration, I found this book slightly confusing but soon got into the story and found it a delightful book to read. The storyline was well thought out and the idea behind the book, that the ageing process has been stopped, was a new and inventive idea.

 

My favourite part was later on in the book where all the alarms are going off and Peter gets to see the drugs being made. Also when Jude is hacking into the various sites, it gave me a thrilling sensation just reading it.

 

This book was an excellent read and I would give it 9/10. I took a mark off because I thought some parts lacked in adventure.

 

Faresha, from The Henrietta Barnett School London

This book is a sequel to The Declaration. Set in the year 2140, a company called Pincent Pharma sells pills which help stop the ageing process. These pills are taking over. Everyone who takes the drug has to sign a piece of paper saying that they will never have children again. But when children are born, they are taken away and brought up to be slaves which are known as “surpluses” that, one day, may be known as “valuable assets”.

 

Anna and Peter who have become “valuable assets” are being forced to sign the ‘declaration’. Peter works for a secret company called the Underground. Peter takes a job at Pincent Pharma which his grandfather, Richard Pincent, owns. He then has orders from Pip, leader of the Underground, to destroy the company.

 

I really like this book because it’s not a book I would normally read, but I found it very interesting. You never know what’s going to happen, whether Peter signs the declaration or not. As this is the second book of a sequel, I would have liked to read the first book first so I could understand the book more easily.

 

My favourite character in the book is Peter because he’s going against his grandfather for what he believes in and what he feels is right. There was a time in the book when he was tempted to sign the declaration but he was strong enough to resist.  

Franklin, from The Thomas Hardye School Dorchester

Having not read The Declaration, the previous book in the series, I was not sure that this book would appeal to me. However, I was completely wrong. This unique storyline was so much more different compared to young spy, horror and extremely cheesy adventure stories. This book defies imagination and brings to life the strong emotions Anna and Peter go through when signing the ‘Declaration for Longevity’, made even harder because of the lies and deceit brought to them by Richard Pincent.

 

I feel that Gemma Malley has captured the devotion and love between Anna and Peter in addition to the emotion of each and every character. She has definitely created an imaginative, unique and gripping book which is perfect in every way.

Heidi, from The Thomas Hardye School Dorchester

The Resistance by Gemma Malley is a very interesting book. It begins in the year 2140. The main character’s grandfather (who is also his arch nemesis) owns a factory that produces a drug that can make you live forever. The story is about the ‘resistance movement’ that tries to stop this drug being produced and enables youth to age.

 

Peter, the main character, is involved in this resistance and thus is stuck in a battle against his family. This battle will prove himself to the girl he has fallen for - Anna. It will also force him to question everything he has ever believed in.

 

Peter begins by talking to his therapist about various things: Anna, his troubles, his life, his thoughts etc. Peter then goes to visit an organisation where he tricks his grandfather by making him think he is on his side when really he is trying to get information about the drugs that his grandfather is producing.

 

The book also focuses on another character named Jude who was bought a computer by his father at a young age and has taught himself how to use it ...

 

As the story progresses Peter finds himself reading a file that contains many names, among which are his own and Anna’s names, and begins to realise the [dreadful implications of this]...

 

This is definitely a page-turner of a book. I would recommend it to teenagers of 13 - 15. 

Isabel, from Newcastle Under Lyme School

The story is about Anna and Peter's love and how everyone can take this drug and they can live young and forever. It was unusual as it was set in the future about 130 years from now. It was slow at the beginning of the story.

 

Peter was caring and faithful. I liked him because he was so dedicated to Anna and would do anything for him. Anna was strong-willed. I liked her as she would do anything for Peter, even sign the ‘Declaration’.

 

Richard was determined and powerful. I didn't like him as he was evil. Pip was very loyal. I liked her quite a bit.

 

I would recommend this book to others as I liked how it was set in the future.

Ishan, from University College School London

I think The Kiss of Death is a very well written and enjoyable book. It carries on from My Swordhand Is Singing. It is quite a sinister and exciting book about ‘hostages’, better known as vampires.

 

The main characters in the book are Marko and Sorrel. They know nothing about each other except that they need find Marko’s father to cure Sorrel’s father who has become demented. But nothing is what it seems and anyone could be possessed or even be the living dead. In this book Peter, from My Swordhand Is Singing, finally finds his target… the Shadow Queen, it is she who is causing all the trouble with the vampires.

 

Peter returns in this book, this time he is a much older person, or at least he should be. No one is sure what he is, as no one should be his age, nor should they look a hundred years younger. All they know is, he has an indestructible and unique sword.  Marko is still a teenager yet he has to find his father and save Venice, with the help of Sorrel, a depressed teen who has a story to tell that could even scare adults.

 

I would recommend The Kiss of Death to everyone as it combines action and thriller, two teens on an adventure and leaves the cliché part behind.

 

 

 

 

Joe, from University College School London

The main idea of Gemma Malley’s book is, without a doubt, a good one (there’s a drug that allows people to live forever but to stop overpopulation no children are allowed). Sadly it seems as though it was completely spent by the end of the first book and the inevitable terrible ‘freedom fighter’ sequel, in which the main characters take on the evil corporation, must follow.

 

The story has little positive I can say about it. In it Anna and Peter, now living as ‘Legals’, are trying to destroy the company that produces ‘Longevity Plus’ under the watch of the head of the freedom fighters. I don’t want to ruin the ending but suffice to say it’s not a plot twist and although it’s supposed to be a shock by the time you’ve got there you simply don’t care. The plot is incredibly clichéd and the writing style bland.

 

The characters, despite Malley’s obvious efforts, are terribly 2-D and the reader forms no real bond with them. Peter is incredibly obnoxious, his rebellious side infuriating; As for Anna - suffice to say that with Anna you wish that the government would keep all ‘surpluses’ locked up forever. I dearly hope that she will give up on this storyline and move on because this horse can’t get any more flogged.

 

Juliet, from The Thomas Hardye School Dorchester

The Resistance is a thought-provoking read. It is a powerful, chilling novel, set in 2140; the dystopia in which Anna, Peter and Ben live is certainly a little disturbing.

 

The future England represents the worries of our present-day society: being controlled by authorities (without acknowledging it), global warming and poverty. The dystopia is, to a certain extent, believable, which is the scariest factor for me.

 

The characters of Anna and Peter aren’t fascinating; however their relationship, their strong love for each other, is powerful and adds flavour to the narrative.

 

The story is a little dull at the beginning, hard to pick up; however the story grows evermore engrossing as you read. Tension mounts throughout the story, the plot takes twists and turns (although sometimes a little predictable), but Gemma Malley leaves little space for the reader to read between the lines - to unlock the even more powerful elements to the story.

 

There are a few parts of the book which allow the reader to imagine what they would do in the character’s situation, which reminds me slightly of Malorie Blackman’s Noughts and Crosses series - as well as the sense of  an “underground” operation, rebellion against the powerful extreme authorities.

 

Overall, I enjoyed The Resistance and would recommend it to a friend.

Michelle, from St James Catholic High School

The book is set in the future when a boy named Peter, who is a ‘Surplus’, falls in love with a girl called Anna, who is also a ‘Surplus’. They both escape the Grange Halls, where all the other young surpluses are kept and tested upon, to create the drug ‘Longevity’.

 

Peter joins the ‘Underground’, who for many years had been against Longevity and struggled to stop Pincent Pharma from creating the drugs that many people took to enable them to live forever. The Underground had a plan for Peter to work in Pincent Pharma and discover what they were really doing in the so called ‘Unit X’.

 

When Peter started, Richard Pincent, his grandfather, tried to persuade him to sign ‘The Declaration’. Meanwhile, Jude, who seems to have a bond with Peter, watches the Pincent Pharma centre by hacking into the cameras by-passing the difficult security codes.

 

Meanwhile Anna and her little brother Ben, who were hated by all and looked upon with disgust, were locked up. Anna was tricked into signing The Declaration when Peter was doing re-training with Dr Edwards.

 

So what is their fate?

 

Although I found the beginning of the story boring, when I started to read more of the chapters I got more involved in the drama. I really enjoyed The Resistance, because it kept tension in the air and lots of drama. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys books set in the future and is imaginative.  9/10

 

Olivia, from The Henrietta Barnett School London

The Resistance is set in the future and is about a person called Peter who is a citizen, but was once a ‘surplus’. A drug [has been found] that allows people to live forever, but the drug can only help organs stay seeming young, but not the skin. So on average everyone looks really old, and the only children you find around are either ‘surpluses’ or used to be ‘surpluses’... And a law was enforced that [dictated that] if someone were to give birth to a child, they would be punished and maybe killed, as having children would overpopulate the world.

 

Peter is the grandson of the inventor of the drug that lets you live forever, and the great-grandson of the man who started it all, but Peter works for people against the drug, as they find it to be bad and messing with nature. But Peter decides to take up a job offer to help with making the drugs, [in order] to report back to the people who are against the drug.

 

Peter isn’t described in a great amount of detail, but you get to find out how he feels and what he thinks at times, from how he acts - how he can be foolish at times, but clever at others. You see that he cares for everyone, and how sometimes he can be good at judging people.

 

The story is written in the third person, which is good as it also follows Anna around, [and you get to know] what Anna feels and thinks, and you learn that not only Peter can be foolish at times, and it’s not always good to trust everyone…

 

Overall I found this was a great book, leaving you wanting to know what happens next; even after the end of the book I wanted to know what would happen next, and I feel that it left me sad that the book finished. I felt that it shows us what problems would happen if there was a drug that let us live forever (even though if we thought about it without reading the book we would think it would be a great idea). By reading the book, you get to learn what problems there would be that you would have to overcome, and that not everything would be good in the world. Rather than focusing on futuristic things, it seems pretty much the same as nowadays, apart from the living-forever part. So really it isn’t that sort of ‘Futuristic’ book you would expect to find. I would recommend it to anyone looking for a good book to read.

Raphael, from University College School London

 This is the sequel to The Declaration, a science fiction novel set in 2140, where the majority of people take ‘Longevity’ drugs, giving them eternal life. The characters this book revolves around – Peter and Anna – are fighting against the hold of ‘Longevity’ over the world. Peter is part of the ‘Underground’, a top-secret resistance movement, fighting against Pincent Pharma, which makes the Longevity pills, and the sinister ‘Authorities’, which avidly support the drive for eternal life.

 

The Underground, headed by the sly yet friendly Pip, the most wanted man in the UK, is portrayed very well. The Underground has the true characteristics of a secretive, hunted, but disciplined resistance organisation. The headquarters changes every few weeks, and the members make particular small talk with each other in public places – this shows that they are both in the Underground, whilst not arousing suspicion from the Authorities or the Catchers. Malley makes the Underground a believable organisation, their behaviour is very much like what a real organisation like theirs would be, and this means that Malley has done very well in representing the Underground.

 

Pincent Pharma is also very well depicted. It seems, on the surface, like a reasonable company which is trying to help the human race by creating Longevity drugs. However, like in many science fiction novels or films, they have inhumane experimentation schemes going on behind closed doors, as Peter finds out all too well when he goes to work there (in order to obtain information for the Underground).

 

Despite this, the world that the Authorities, Pincent Pharma and the Underground inhabit doesn’t seem as believable. The combination of these makes the world on the whole rather far-fetched. It becomes almost too sinister and corrupt to be plausible. It mustn’t be forgotten, though, that that is the science fiction style in a nutshell, and so it is forgivable.

 

The Resistance is a well-written novel with an enthralling plot. The Underground and Pincent Pharma are two main elements of the book, and they are excellently portrayed, making for a fascinating storyline with a thrilling climax to round it off. 

Rufus, from University College School London

The year is 2140. Having escaped the horrors of Grange Hall, Peter and Anna are living freely on the Outside, trying hard to lead normal lives, but unable to leave the terror of the Declaration - and their experiences as ‘surpluses’ - completely behind them. Peter is determined to infiltrate Pharma Corporation which is run by his grandfather, which claims to have a new drug in the works; "Longevity+" will not just stop the ravages of old age, it is rumoured to reverse the aging process. But what Peter and Anna discover behind the walls of Pharma is so nightmarish it makes the prison of their childhood seem like a sanctuary…

 

Shocking, controversial, and frighteningly topical, this sequel to Gemma Malley's stellar debut novel, The Declaration, could take the conversation about ethics and science to the next level.

 

This book has a dark and thrilling climax, and Malley is a master of suspense; it would easily merit 9/10, and I urge you all to read it.

Seeta, from The Henrietta Barnett School London

The Resistance is the sequel to The Declaration, which was the first book in the series. The first book was written from Anna’s point of view and The Resistance is from Peter’s point of view.

 

 

In 2140, ageing is a thing of the past and people can live forever. However, this is not necessarily a good thing. There is a secret group of people who are rebelling against the idea and the need to be forever young. Peter was involved in the resistance movement since he was a child and is sure that he knows where his loyalty lies. However, he is now against his own family as well as the controlling government. He questions all he has ever believed in. Meanwhile, Anna is up to something… The Resistance is a more mature book than its prequel and is for ages 12+. The genre for this book is romance and action.

 

 

The main character in this book is Peter. I thought that his character was well thought out and written as he made a few bad choices and good choices which made him seem more believable. The story is supposed to be set in the future but still have real people in it and Peter helped make the story sound more real and showed that people are still the same in the future. The other notable characters are Anna (who was the main character in The Declaration), a man named Pip and a boy called Jude.

 

 

The main message of the book was that it is not necessarily a good thing to live forever. This was shown in the book from how it could affect you to how it could affect the planet. If people lived forever and new generations were being born there wouldn’t be enough space for everyone, and if new people weren’t being born the world might not move on and progress as there aren’t any new views on various subjects. In the book, the children were being blamed for being born.

 

 

I actually preferred the prequel because I did not like a few parts of this book such as when the key character acts against his principles. However, I thought that the end of The Resistance wrapped up the whole story well and some of the questions from the prequel were answered. I also liked some of the new inventions in the future like the machine which gives you food according to what you need. There was also some good descriptive language such as ‘his questions were met with wry smiles, evasive propaganda, or blank stares’.

 

 

The Resistance is a story of conflicting ideas and brainwashing. Overall, I think that this was a good book and I would recommend it. 

Shankavi, from University College School London

The “well written dystopian thriller” fiction novel, The Resistance, was written by Gemma Malley. It falls into the category of war and romance. The novel is based on a young man named Peter, who fights the battle against ageing but is tested [for] his love and loyalty to Anna, the girl he loves. He struggles to decide whether to defend his own kin or his love. It shows a dark and sinister vision of the future as it is set in 2140 and [is about] a scientific discovery which can change the world forever. The factory of Pincent Pharma may have wisdom but is covered by a thick layer of lies. The Resistance is an incredibly thought-provoking read. It is a beautifully written and it is quite mesmerizing. I mention “quite” mesmerizing because I would not believe that it is the best book I have read.

 

The character that is my favourite and I most adore is Anna. I believe that she is truly humble and dedicated towards her love. She would give up herself and beliefs for Peter and it was noticeable that Peter was her real identity. She was caring to not only Peter but Pip and Ben as well. She gave a great amount of respect to people who she considered to be compassionate. I believe that the author describes Anna’s character well as I was able to picture her and her characteristics clearly in my imagination.

 

My favourite part in this futuristic novel is when the whole Underground team work together with Peter... I really enjoyed reading this because I felt that the author built up a lot of dramatic tension and curiousness which made the novel very effective.

 

The front cover of the novel gives a slight hint about its basic plot. The small fly can signify Peter who is trapped in a lot of distress of choosing decisions. He is trapped in the company of Pincent Pharma. The title, ‘The Resistance’, explains a bit of the story as well as Peter keeps resisting signing the ‘declaration’.

 

In conclusion, I think that this is a well-written book and I am looking forward to reading more books of Gemma Malley. I believe that she can clearly outline the story and I would recommend this book to other keen readers.

Thulashika, from The Henrietta Barnett School London

How would you feel to live in the future where there is nothing to worry about and live a life filled with joy? How would you feel to be living in a period of time when life involving discoveries took place? This futuristic novel is based on a world after a scientific discovery has taken place in the future and it changes the world forever. It lets you discover the battles against this amazing discovery and open up your mind freely to imagine what it would be like to live in this world. I thought this story was quite fascinating as it built so much imagery in my head that I wanted to read on.

 

Set in 2140, The Resistance written by Gemma Malley is an extraordinary novel filled with almost everything a good book needs: action, romance and excitement. I enjoyed the way the author didn’t just focus on one of the main characters (Peter) throughout the whole book, but slowly introduced new characters in a different but mysterious way. She then linked the characters later on in the novel to add some spice to the storyline which worked really well.

 

I would recommend this book to teenagers who are interested in science-related novels.

Yasmine, from St James Catholic High School

The book is set in the future and is about a boy named Peter who is sixteen and in love with a girl named Anna. They have both escaped from a place called Grange Hall where ‘Surpluses’ (children) are kept. The book is based around Richard Pincent, Peter’s grandfather, who works to make special drugs to make people live forever. These drugs basically renew the old cells in the body, and make the old cells new again. …

 

 

When Peter’s grandfather offers him work in one of the labs in his building, he says ‘yes, of course’...

 

 

Richard Pincent forces Peter and Anna to sign 'The Declaration’; Peter says yes, but Anna says no. So, Richard Pincent goes to Anna’s home and forces her to sign The Declaration; of course she had a sort of choice, but she signed it for Peter’s sake.

 

 

 

Peter discovers his grandfather’s live-forever drug , ‘Longevity+’… When Anna gets kidnapped, Peter, his friends, and The Underground suddenly find themselves working together to find her …. Shockingly, when [the truth is discovered] … Peter finds that Richard Pincent is more than dangerous...

 

 

I enjoyed the book a lot! I would vote the book 10/10